One of My Favorites

It’s been awhile since I’ve made an entry, because I have been so frustrated with my little “fan art” project, not even a third of the way through.  I was just going to make three beanies with a design.  That was it; however, I have tried two separate methods to achieve the

No way was I continuing with this method!

Removing the stitching

look I want, and have failed miserably!  I tried intarsia in the the round. The method used a modified short rows hook up, and you actually went back and forth. Not good.  The site of the join was lumpy, bumpy and quite easy to see.  I went to my LYS where I was told to use duplicate stitch instead.  So I tried the duplicate stitch which, apparently, I’m not that good at.  Stitching on fabric knitted with fingering weight yarn is beyond what my eyes want to do anymore, even with reading glasses!  The hat itself is fine.  The pattern that I attempted to duplicate stitch over the fabric, not so good.  As you can see, I am in the process of recycling the hat itself and someone (my husband) will get a nice, bright red toque.

This one worked!

That was actually the first time I’d worked with fingering weight yarn for something other than a pair of socks, and the process took way longer than I thought it would.  So, learning from this disaster, I changed the design, and employed worsted weight yarn.  The results?  Not as fancy as I would have liked, but at least it was completed, and I can carry on with my life!  Will I try fingering weight yarn again?  You bet.  Will I try the same design again?  Yes, because it was supposed to be correct.  Will I post it?  Eh.  Maybe.

If anyone out there has successfully created designs with duplicate stitching on fingering weight yarn fabric, please let me know what your secret is!

Now, on to one of my favorite subjects – food!  The title of this blog is referring to the food, not the knit fails!  I thought I would share this with you, as it is a good all around pork recipe that can be incorporated into many other foods, and is not seasonal, even though it’s cooked in a crockpot.  I originally posted this on Cafe Luna’s blog to see if I could get some other fab recipes from locals here in Colfax using Mario’s salsa.  So far, I’ve been the only one.  Maybe that will change?  For those of you not fortunate enough to live in the area, substitute your favorite green salsa in lieu of Mario’s blend.  You guys have any good recipes that uses salsa?  Post it here!

Glenda’s Gringo Slow Cooker Pork Chile Verde

2 lbs. pork, preferably a little fatty, cut into one-inch cubes

1 onion, chopped

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 pint Tenderfoot Salsa Verde

flour for coating

salt and pepper to taste

cooking oil

Heat oil in a large skillet on medium high, then add onion and cook until almost transparent; add the garlic.  Cook another minute, careful not to burn the garlic.  Remove the onions and garlic from the skillet and put into your slow cooker.  Add more oil, if necessary; should cover the bottom of the pan.  Coat the pork in salted and peppered flour and brown the meat in two separate batches.  You’re not trying to cook the meat at this point, you’re just caramelizing the proteins to give the verde a richer flavor.  Mix all ingredients together in your slow cooker and pour the Tenderfoot Salsa Verde over the mix.  Remember, the slow cooking will render out meat juices, so you may not want to use the whole pint.  That’s up to you.  Anyway, cook on slow for 6 – 7 hours, high for 3 – 4 hours.  Makes a nice meal with leftovers!

The original posted here – https://cafelunacolfax.wordpress.com/2018/01/09/salsa-recipes/

If you want rice to go with, here is a recipe of mine:

https://nittinninja.wordpress.com/2016/02/16/chile-rellenos-casserole-and-green-rice/   –  Scroll all the way down for the green rice recipe.  It’s worth it!

 

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